Defomicron

Software, Hardware, Silverware


Entries tagged: Twitter

That one twitty site.

Whither App.net

I think Ben Brooks was the last to leave. Hope he got the lights.

Tweetbot 3

Tweetbot 3, the first version designed for iOS 7, is out now. It’s delightful and without doubt one of the great iOS 7 apps. The $3 is a no-brainer, and it’s replaced Twitterrific as my Twitter client of choice on my iPhone. If you’re interested, Federico Viticci has a thorough review of it (he’s been beta-testing it for several months).

‘The Dumbest Thing I’ve Ever Heard Of’

MG Siegler on the Twitter IPO:

All of the best new ideas sound stupid to most people at some point. This isn’t rocket science: if an idea is immediately obvious to so many people, it would have been done already. My point is simply that not only is hearing “that’s the dumbest thing I’ve ever heard of” not a bad sign, it has the potential to be a great one.

‘How Twitter Sold Me My First iPhone’

Another story from the iPhone launch six years ago, this time it’s John Moltz:

Oh, the shame and jealousy I felt, hearing about my friends, fellow Apple nerds and complete strangers standing in line for hours for a phone.

The Origin of Tweet

Craig Hockenberry on the history of “tweet”:

It’s not everyday that a word you helped create gets added to this prestigious publication, so I thought I’d share a bit of the early history of the word “tweet.”

App.net

Matt Gemmell has a nice piece up on how he’s been using App.net. I started using the service recently, and I’m basically of the same opinion as Matt: Twitter, but higher quality.

This is probably a good time to announce that there’s now an official Defomicron App.net account. It functions exactly like the official Twitter account, posting links to each one of my posts.

Tent

Decentralized services put users in control. Companies and products do not last forever. If a company changes its terms, shuts down, is acquired, discontinues a product, no problem – users can take their data and services with them and set up somewhere else – on their own server or at another service provider. Decentralized, protocol-based systems offer users a choice of providers and developers the opportunity to innovate, since developers deal directly with users, not a platform or company.

If we are going to have a Twitter-like service that lasts, Tent is the way to do it. Tent is decentralized, like email or SMS. App.net is just another Twitter.

Promoted Tweets in Twitter for iPhone

Ben Brooks:

By injecting ads (I mean promoted tweets) into the timelines of their mobile apps, the company is (presumably) making money.

Twitter’s tragic flaw was its focus purely on the product and not at all on the profit.